6 ideas for staying calm… What I’ve learnt from junior tennis

196385-green-sports-playing-soccer-sports-training-net-tennis-photocase-stock-photo-largeIn my last blog I raised the ‘parent sportsmanship’ challenge; can you keep your emotions in check and stay relaxed so it is not obvious whether your child is winning or losing?

Though in fact the real challenge is trying to remain calm. This is the best support you can give your child during a match and then immediately afterwards.

Trophies, tear and line calls: The guide for tennis parents written by the @tennisdaduk is available. The book contains many strategies and reflections that parents can use to support their children.

This blog recommends six techniques that I have tried in the search for inner calm or other parents have suggested to me.

  1. Smile! Yes it sounds simple yet also so hard but it is true that if you can smile you will stay calmer. I particularly like the idea of breathing to calm down  and then breathe out with a smile.breath in
  2. Make two lists. The first list is all the things that your child has done right. It could be individual shots or rallies and certain points in the match or it could be tactics or strategies that they have employed. The second list is things that have frustrated you during the match. It could be when your child has struggled with their tactics or it could be the way that they have managed their emotions. Before the match ends, pick up the negative list, rip it up and throw the bits in the bin. There is nothing to be gained by sharing these with your child and the act of destroying the list is a way of emptying your mind of them. The positive list are things to share with your child and you choose when is the most appropriate time.
  3. Do some counting! Why not count different aspects of your child’s tennis. I have found that by doing this, you reduce your stress over points in the match. You could count how many shots each point lasts or much more complex things too. Below is some counting I have done and here is the explanation. (http://ow.ly/BAJr30gCWEK)tennis recording
  4. Try and sit where you do not have an exact view of lines. Don’t sit immediately behind the courts or on the baseline. If you have a view akin to that of a line judge you will inevitably see mistakes from both players which are likely to be purely accidental as you actually have a better view than players who are also trying to hit their shots at the same time. If you sit a little distance from the court you can try and enjoy watching their rallies and at times being unaware of the exact score can be a good feeling.
  5. thermosI always have a flask of coffee with me and pour myself lots of small drinks. I never fill my cup as I find the act of taking the top of the flask, pouring a small slug of coffee, putting the lid back on and then sipping the drink quite therapeutic. It is also a small physical activity to do with my hands.
  6. just-be-in-the-momentTry and practice mindfulness, so stay in the moment rather than trying to work out the rest of the draw and the possible result of each win and loss. See my blog on mindfulness.

If you have suggestions of your own, then I’d love to hear them. Why not leave your thoughts as a comment below for other readers to see.

Good luck!

I am a tennis parent, educationalist and author. If you’ve found this blog interesting, then please buy a copy of my guide for tennis parents, ‘Trophies, tears and line calls’ which is available from Amazon. Equally please follow me on on twitter @tennisdaduk.

Trophies, tears and line calls: The guide for tennis parents

Responses from Twitter:

@jameswweir1 – A great article, I’ve been to many competitions with my girls and keeping calm and giving the right support is not easy, enjoying the blog!

@handwtennis – One of the best blogs out there.

@Rayner96P Just enjoy the tennis and appreciate the play from both players. It is a fantastically entertaining sport to watch and I am amazed at the level kids can play at.

@1tennisgeek Great tips although 11year olds can be difficult to please. Last week at Matchplay I was accused of smiling and writing things down – Unfortunately you can’t win them all!

@adkinsred I’m going to try all 6 this Sunday!

@Andy_J_Davis I think you learn to take pressure of kids as you and they learn more. Tough enough for them out there!

6 thoughts on “6 ideas for staying calm… What I’ve learnt from junior tennis

  1. Pingback: Parent Sportsmanship…What I’ve learnt from junior tennis | tennisdadblog

  2. Pingback: What I’ve learnt from junior tennis…Keep learning | tennisdadblog

  3. Pingback: Showing confidence in your child… What I’ve learnt from junior tennis | tennisdadblog

  4. David Gibson

    Great tips although 11year olds can be difficult to please. Last week at Matchplay I was accused of smiling and writing things down..

    Reply

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